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How dependable are the dividends, you ask? Well, I only buy stocks of companies which have solid earnings, electrical utilities, pipelines, banks, and food retailers mostly. And further, I want companies which have paid dividends for a least a decade, preferably more: 20 years is a good standard. Dividends are surer than capital gains. The idea of growing income is so simple. I don't understand why more folks don't do it. Think about these ideas. How dependable are the dividends, you ask? Well, I only buy stocks of companies which have solid earnings, electrical utilities, pipelines, banks, and food retailers mostly. And further, I want companies which have paid dividends for a least a decade, preferably more: 20 years is a good standard. Dividends are surer than capital gains. The idea of growing income is so simple. I don't understand why more folks don't do it. Think about these ideas.
-Increasing income is the key. Say you are 50. Assume further that you buy a common stock with a 5% yield and that over the next few decades the dividend grows at 4% a year. By the time you are 69, you could be getting over 12% on your money. Consider this too: if the common stock with the growing income is in your RRIF, you might not ever have to touch the original capital in your RRIF. Whether the market goes up or down in the short term is irrelevant. The growing dividends can supply a good portion of your retirement income and, in most cases, your capital grows along with the dividend. I've been retired twenty years and withdrawing from my RRIF for five years. Not only is my original capital still intact, it has more doubled. The 4% maximum withdrawal rule, often touted by planners, does not apply provided you set up your dividend growth strategy well before retirement+Increasing income is the key. Say you are 50. Assume further that you buy a common stock with a 5% yield and that over the next few decades the dividend grows at 4% a year. By the time you are 69, you could be getting over 12% on your money. Consider this too: if the common stock with the growing income is in your RRIF, you might not ever have to touch the original capital in your RRIF. Whether the market goes up or down in the short term is irrelevant. The growing dividends can supply a good portion of your retirement income and, in most cases, your capital grows along with the dividend. I've been retired twenty four years and withdrawing from my RRIF for eleven years. Not only is my original capital still intact, it has more doubled. The 4% maximum withdrawal rule, often touted by planners, does not apply provided you set up your dividend growth strategy well before retirement. Think closer to a 5% figure.
Some sixty Canadian companies increase their dividends each year: learn which companies, understand dividends, discover the ramifications of dividend increases. Dividend-paying common stocks are safer. Some companies have had double digit dividend growth for years. You'll be delighted when you discover the essence of the dividend growth investing strategy. Some more information on this retirement strategy will be available at dividendgrowth.ca from time to time. Some sixty Canadian companies increase their dividends each year: learn which companies, understand dividends, discover the ramifications of dividend increases. Dividend-paying common stocks are safer. Some companies have had double digit dividend growth for years. You'll be delighted when you discover the essence of the dividend growth investing strategy. Some more information on this retirement strategy will be available at dividendgrowth.ca from time to time.
Here's why you have to get out of mutual funds, not be put into ETFs and learn to invest on your own. "Between 1984 and 2002, the stock market index made returns of 12.2 per cent a year. The average mutual fund investor made 2.6 per cent." Hard to believe, eh! Margaret Wente, Globe and Mail p.A23 December 11, 2003 Here's why you have to get out of mutual funds, not be put into ETFs and learn to invest on your own. "Between 1984 and 2002, the stock market index made returns of 12.2 per cent a year. The average mutual fund investor made 2.6 per cent." Hard to believe, eh! Margaret Wente, Globe and Mail p.A23 December 11, 2003
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